The Cordell Family and Hoegemeyer - A 38-Year Partnership

January 2, 2018

In 1974 Steven Cordell started farming in northwest Missouri and was first introduced to Hoegemeyer products by a neighbor dealer. Five years later, he married and starting selling for the brand with a personal challenge to get his in-laws to plant 100 percent Hoegemeyer.

This challenge took a couple years of adding a few Hoegemeyer bags to their line-up and many conversations, but Steven’s father-in-law and brother-in-law were convinced that they needed to be all in. “They found the yields and seed quality were consistently better than what they had been planting,” added Steven.

Cordell’s 38-year dealership is truly a family affair spanning generations. Steven, with the help of his wife Debbie, operated out of his car trunk and garage during the early years and have grown their business to include their children and spouses. “My son, Ryan, has always had a passion for agriculture and he’s a lot better salesman than me,” states Steven.

 

Today, RKS Seeds operates out of Parnell, Mo., and includes Steven; his son, Ryan; and son-in-law, Kelly. RKS Seeds is noted among growers for their solid reputation and trustworthy way of doing business. “We have developed a venture that I’m even prouder of today than when it started in the late 1970’s,” states Steven.

RKS Seeds understands the value of investing in their dealership to serve growers in the most timely and dependable way – this includes additional seed storage, seed treating capabilities and product knowledge. “Our way of doing business is simple. Offer superior customer service and strive for excellence to keep customers satisfied!”

Steven chose to first start selling Hoegemeyer because it was a family owned business and feels they treat everyone like family. “They are very down to earth; have a great knowledge of breeding and in their products. That hasn’t change over the past 38 years. Hoegemeyer allows us to be ourselves and do what works best for us and our customers,” Steven adds.

RKS Seeds has great vision to continue serving the area with top products and the highest quality service. “My hope is the future RKS Seeds will include my grandchildren. This is a family business that we want to keep in the family!”

“My advice for future dealers is to show your appreciation to customers and always seek ways to serve them better!”

– Steven Cordell, RKS Seeds

Comments: 0     Tags: dealer    

Evaluating Corn Performance in 2017

December 18, 2017

Several years ago our agronomy team identified four qualities that we felt set our corn lineup apart from the competition: drought and Goss’s Wilt tolerance, more harvestable yield and genetic diversity. The 2017 growing season brought significant challenges to some areas, while customers in other areas had record yields.
 
We did not let this season go to waste for evaluating new products and making improvements for future years. We revisited these four points of differentiation to assess how our lineup performed.
 

Drought Tolerance

Dry conditions plagued the northern plains early in the 2017 growing season, but timely rains alleviated the drought somewhat as the season progressed. Southeast Nebraska and northeast Kansas started the season with good moisture with drought impacting yields during pollination and grain fill. With different droughts in different areas of the western corn belt, we had a good chance to evaluate drought performance across much of our lineup. Below is a high level summary of how our hybrids ranked in drought environments.

A high-level look at the relative performance of our products specifically in drought environments below 150 bushels per acre from 2015-17. 

It's noted that corn products rated 8 or 9 for drought continue to rise to the top, with still some good product performance with 7’s. While I think that farmers with drought-prone fields should plant the majority of their acres to 8’s and 9’s, planting a product rated a 7 for drought on some acres can open up some other good product options and increase genetic diversity on the farm.  

Goss’s Wilt Tolerance

We haven’t seen a widespread outbreak of Goss’s Wilt since 2011. A lack of natural Goss’s Wilt pressure is good for farmers but makes it more challenging for seed companies to screen new hybrids for Goss’s Wilt tolerance. Fortunately our products are tested in special trials that are inoculated with Goss’s Wilt. From what I’ve seen from these trials, we have strong overall Goss’s Wilt tolerance in our newer products. Hoegemeyer 8414 AM stands out with a 7 score, and many of our new products carry a 6 rating, which makes them suited for Goss’s Wilt-prone fields.

More Harvestable Yield

More harvestable yield means that our products need to be able to stand and hold onto their ears until harvested. Multiple late October wind events impacted growers in Nebraska and surrounding areas in 2017. For more information on the factors that may have caused late season harvest issues, read UNL’s Cropwatch update

Products from all seed companies were impacted by the winds but not all hybrids were affected the same. In our lineup, we had products that stood quite well against the wind, but some of the higher yielding racehorse products seemed to be the most prone to lodging and ear drop. We are taking all of this into account as we make product recommendations for 2018. Going forward, we know that growers will not be satisfied if we abandon high-yielding products for the sake of bullet-proof agronomics. Selecting products will remain a balance between top-end yield potential and agronomics, but we are committed to providing more products that strike the right balance.  

Genetic Diversity

2017 was an example of how genetic diversity mitigated risk from unpredictable weather events. When a weather event “picks on” one specific style of hybrid, a farmer can usually handle some problems on a percentage of acres, but not the entire farm. Several of our race horse products that were introduced in the 2014-2015 time period share a common parent, and these were among the hardest hit in our lineup by the 2017 winds.

We have several new products for 2018 that are bringing racehorse type yields with different parental backgrounds. 2018, 2019 and 2020 will usher in a lot of new genetic options across our entire lineup. Also, with full regulatory approval of Qrome™ brand products expected soon, genetic diversity will get a boost in our triple stack lineup.


Categories: corn, drought     Comments: 0    

Performance Through Protection: NEW RIGHT STAND® Soybean Seed Treatment for 2018

November 6, 2017

Soybean seed treatments provide a means to capture greater yield by protecting the genetic yield potential of every seed, bag and acre.  Seed treatments enable each field to maximize productivity as well as minimize risk. There are no rescue treatments for soil insects or pathogens. Growers can only protect each field from them through a preventative approach. Here are a few reasons why seed treatment are profitable.

Wider Planting Window

  • Planting in cool, wet soils may result in slower emergence
  • Increased seed and seedling disease pressure
  • Seed treatments allow for earlier planting dates and significantly reduced likelihood of replant

Tolerance to High Residue Environments

  • Increased crop residues can harbor insects and pathogens
  • Residue is associated with cool soil temperatures which delay emergence

Improved Soybean Plant Performance

  • Increased stand
  • Improved seedling vigor and emergence
  • 2.5 bushel average yield advantage for Right Stand over no treatment
  • 2-10 bushel yield advantage for Right Stand® + ILeVO® over base package depending on severity of SDS and SCN pressure

However, not all seed treatments are created equal. The true value of a specific seed treatment can be obtained with three questions.

  1. What individual products make up the seed treatment package?
  2. What rate(s) are being applied? This is critically important!
  3. How accurately are the individual products being applied?

The Right Stand® soybean seed treatment from Hoegemeyer is a proprietary mix of chemistries including an insecticide, a biological root growth stimulant, and multiple mode of action fungicides applied at full labeled rates providing broad spectrum pest protection.

A common misconception is that seed treatments are only needed for early planting dates. Although early planting dates are at increased risk from several pests, a common disease such as phytophthora which is the #1 most yield limiting soybean disease in the U.S., is also very active under warm and wet soil conditions. Areas in fields with poor drainage and compaction are especially prone to phytophthora infection. Soybean plants that are partially susceptible may appear stunted and yield less than a resistant or non-infected plant.




New for 2018, Right Stand includes Dupont™ Lumisena™ for industry leading control of phytophthora as well as improved seedling vigor and emergence. DuPont™ Lumisena™ contains a new active ingredient - Oxathiapiprolin. This new mode of action fungicide works to control oomycete infestation during multiple stages of the pathogen’s life cycle, resulting in increased stands, healthier plants, and overall greater crop efficiency.

Contact your local Hoegemeyer DSM or Agronomist to put Right Stand with Dupont Lumisena to work on your farm in 2018.

ILeVO® is a registered trademark of Bayer. EverGol® is a registered trademark of Bayer.


Categories: seed treatment, Soybeans     Comments: 0    

#Plant17 May Be A Soggy Situation

May 23, 2017

Conditions have been wet and cool across many midwest states this planting season. What does this mean for your planted soybean fields?

Damping Off
Soybean stand loss early in the season is often due to “damping off” which is a broad term which refers to seed and seedling diseases. The four big ones are pythium, phytophthora, fusarium and rhizoctonia. Pythophthora and pythium are often the two most common and troubling for us in our market area. These two pathogens are sometimes also referred to in slang as “water molds” as they thrive in saturated soils with free water. They have spores that can survive in soil and crop residue for long periods of time and when soils become saturated with free water spores can detect plant root exudates. They then literally swim to the root and infect. Quite simply, without wet soils they are not able to readily infect, so in drier years they are typically not an issue. 

Pythium
Stand loss early in the season with early-to-normal planting dates is more typically associated with pythium because it thrives in cold wet soils; while phytophthora infects more readily in somewhat warmer wet soils. With the recent cooler weather, pythium may be the leading candidate as the pathogen causing any stand loss/damping off within fields but an actual lab diagnosis can often be the only way to 100% confirm the pathogen in question as all four of the major soybean damping off diseases can be hard to distinguish from one another with the naked eye and their infection environments can overlap each other.

Genetic Resistance
Many soybean varieties offer native genetic resistance to specific races of phytophthora which is very valuable. However, there are many different races of phytophthora present even within the same field, so one specific phytophthora gene may not always be effective. Partial resistance or “field tolerance” is also a rating which you will see in most product guides which is just as important. The fungicidal components of virtually all complete soybean seed treatment packages also offers a level of protection against the damping off pathogens. However, that protection can simply be overwhelmed under high pressure saturated soil conditions and begins to slowly fade following the first few weeks after planting.

Use of Pre-Emerge Herbicides
Soybean seedlings may also be further stressed when PPO soybean pre-emerge herbicides containing flumioxazin, sulfentrazone, or saflufenacil have been used in conjunction with cool and wet soil conditions. Soybean pre-emerge herbicides containing these actives are quite common in the industry and used on lots of soybean acres as they are generally good at controlling problematic small seeded broadleaves such as marestail and waterhemp. These herbicides can cause some stunting of seedlings most often due to some minor to moderate burning of the cotyledons and hypocotyl as the seedling emerges through the soil/herbicide layer. Cool wet conditions make it harder for the young seedling to metabolize the chemical.

It is quite possible that any fields currently showing damping off symptoms may have more than one thing going on. Variety, pathogen and herbicide may all play a part.

Contact your local Hoegemeyer DSM or Agronomist for more information.


Categories: Planting, Soils, Soybeans     Comments: 0    

Corn Planting and the Potential for Chilling Injury

April 28, 2017

The Midwest has experienced some stretches of below-normal temperatures, with cold, rainy conditions this spring. Research shows that the opportune time to plant corn is somewhere between the last two weeks of April and the first few days of May. However, Mother Nature isn’t necessarily on that same schedule. Fields that have been recently planted or those that will be planted in the next couple days may be subject to seedling injury.

SIGNS OF INJURY

Corn that has been recently planted in the Midwest has experienced less-than-ideal overall conditions, especially when it comes to temperature. In many locations, the weather pattern of cold rain and low temperatures has potential to promote a problem for young seedlings called “Imbibitional Chilling Injury.” Some basic visual symptoms may be corkscrewing of the young germinating plant or leafing out below ground level. Consider digging up a few seedlings and checking them for signs of corkscrewing, leafing out underground or damping off.

WHY WOULD SEEDLINGS REACT LIKE THIS?

A possible issue that cause less than optimum stands and poor emergence is chilling injury to the mesocotyl or coleoptile plant tissue caused by sub-lethal cold temperatures (less than 50 degrees) during the period very soon after planting when seeds begin to imbibe water. The seed will not begin to germinate until the soil temp approaches 50 degrees, however, the seed will allow water to enter regardless of temperature. This chilling injury basically equates to cells rupturing which results in the corkscrewing of the mesocotyl. This delays the emergence of the coleoptile prior to the usual emergence of leaves from the coleoptile.

In addition to slowing the germination process, cold temperatures, snow and cold rains may cause irreparable harm to the delicate structures of an emerging corn seedling. When dry corn seed absorbs cold water, Imbibitional Chilling Injury is not uncommon. Such injury in corn seeds ruptures cell membranes and results in aborted radicles, proliferation of seminal roots, delayed seedling growth and potential for diseases pathogens to attack the young seedling. When temperatures remain at or below 50 degrees Fahrenheit after planting or fall below 50 degrees within 24-48 after planting, damage to germinating seed can be particularly severe as they imbibe water. This should be considered as there is risk associated with the temperature and moisture roller coaster we have experienced so far this planting season.

If you have any questions, contact your local Hoegemeyer agronomist or District Sales Manager.


Categories: Corn, Frost Injury, Management     Comments: 0     Tags: 2017 Planting, chilling injury    

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